Pride and Patience: the Spoils of Victory

If God likes the game of soccer, then he would probably be pleased with Team Germany. That isn’t to say he would be picking sides in the World Cup, of course. How could he? After all, Pope Francis and more than 90% of all Argentinians have a long tradition anchored in the Catholic faith. But there is a lot about the team spirit in Germany to be proud of today.

As Pope Francis tweeted this weekend:

Pope Tweets on the World Cup.

Far different from the battlefields of war, ethnic tension and interfaith conflict, soccer fans from around the globe come together in events like the World Cup to put differences behind themselves and engage each other in a friendly and sporting environment.

Since World War II, Germany has risen to the challenge and taken the World Cup four times. On the current occasion and faced with the daunting task of defeating Brazil in the semi-finals, Germany did so with confidence and humility. In the routing the Cup’s host country 7:1, Team Germany went out of it’s way to show grace toward Brazil both in the media and on the playing field. Now that it has won the championship by defeating Argentina 1:0, Germany has earned the right to be proud of it’s accomplishment. The spirit of the World Cup would be best served if that national pride is now used to further encourage the values of fairness, inclusion and sportsmanlike behavior in all walks of life.

By denouncing racism, supporting gay athletes to live openly and fighting corruption at all levels in the sporting business, Germany can be a leader with impact that goes far beyond the world of soccer. Step by step it can, in short, prove that true victory is not measured by the spoils of war, but by the progress achieved in a long fought battle.

Applied to the “real world”, challenges abound. With a unique historical perspective and sense for moderation, Germany can use its strength and power of example to help resolve ethnic and sectarian conflicts, humanitarian refugee crises, income inequality and the struggle between security and personal freedom. Admired around the world, it is time for Germany look beyond the national pride of the moment and to build and advance its reputation as a reliable force for real progress on the world stage.

Both Germany and Argentina can take heart in the aspirational words found in Ecclesiastes:

The end of a matter is better than its beginning, and patience is better than pride. (Ecclesiastes 7:8)

For Argentina, who itself is no stranger to World Cup finals, both team and country can look back at a hard fought and successful competition, which could have ended a lot earlier if it didn’t have the faith and the will to succeed. In Sports like in life, there is consolation that the next opportunity to prove your faith is just around the corner.

Sheep vs. Goats

Screenshot 2014-07-09 11.32.36 Source: UNHCR

If Christian life is full of hardship, whose suffering is worse: the fate of a lost and hungry child or that of the family “forced” to take the child in? Wasn’t it also the fate of Jesus to wander in search of those who are loving and faithful – not only to the Son of God, but also to each other.

For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in.

Matthew 25:35

The United States prides itself as an exceptional nation and a beacon for the poor and downtrodden. Conservatives across the country are quick to declare their moral views and family values. When faced with the current refugee crisis on the southern border, however, these good shepherds look more like the euphemistic goat.

Americans outraged by the inflows of children and their mothers from Central America should consider this – you are not alone. Just this year more that 68,000 refugees from Africa crossed the Mediterranean Sea to reach Italy, slightly higher than the number of “illegals” entering the US during the same time frame – and the European refugees were mostly adults, not children. In fact, the most recent UNHCR data shows that many other countries are shouldering a much larger burden than the United States. The number of refugees to the US pales by comparison with Europe for example. At only a quarter of the size of the United States, Germany took in 600,000 refugees in 2010 compared with less than 300.000 refugees to the US.

While the humanitarian refugee crisis is also hotly debated in Europe, it’s mostly a debate about an acceptable level of care for refugees and their equitable distribution within the EU while giving the refugees due process to plead their case. In the US, on the other hand, the debate centers around how to beef up border security and “protect the homeland” against “illegals.” Shutting their eyes to the real source of the humanitarian crisis in Central America, unchristian-like protesters prefer to blame President Obama and block busses of immigrants from entering their communities. Ironically, the more generous European policies are arguably the result of enlightened post WWII politics which were shaped at least in part by the United States.

The reality is that the United States AND Europe ARE beacons of hope for many around the world. Increasing numbers of refugees are not the result of failed border controls, but a symptom of the growing income inequality in parts of the world that Pope Francis discussed with President Obama during their visit in March. Clearly the United States and Europe cannot integrate all of the world’s suffering people into their countries – and yes they have many of their own problems to solve. Unless Americans wake up to the true reality and invest more time and energy in the political and economic development of their neighbor states (instead of fighting long distance wars), the refugee crisis will continue.

In the meantime it would be a welcome change of tone if more Americans would demonstrate a little more patience and Christian-like compassion while working with the President on meaningful long-term immigration reform. Progressive or conservative, most Americans should be able to find common ground. I pray that Washington just gets it done.

‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’

Matthew 25:40

Refugees in EU

Honor your father AND your mother.

Twitter Prayers for the Pope

Each Spring Fathers’ Day and Mothers’ Day come and go with tradition and ritual, but little thought toward their deeper meaning. Reading the many personal tributes on twitter and Facebook this fathers’ day weekend reminds me of the virtues of my own father and of the Proverb (15:20):

A wise son brings joy to his father, but a foolish man despises his mother.

To all religions, from Christianity to Islam, fathers and mothers alike are entrusted to be good guardians and shepherds of their flock and children are taught to respect the teachings of their parents. Even those who feel disappointed or misled by their parents can honor their father and mother by giving thanks to the life they were given. Considering the good virtues passed on by the family as a whole, including by grandparents, siblings, aunts and uncles, wives and partners, we can be thankful that all of these people have shaped who we are.

A few hours ago Pope Francis tweeted this prayer: “May the Lord bless the family and strengthen it in this moment of crisis.” While there are those who will narrowly interpret this as an appeal to uphold “traditional family values” with regard to marriage, sexuality and the respective roles of men and women, it is important to remember that these roles have been the subjects of controversy and evolving interpretations throughout time and across religions. I prefer a more universal understanding of the Pope’s blessings today.

The crisis of which the Pope speaks is manifold and the evildoers are for the most part *men* who show nothing but disregard for their roles and responsibilities as good shepherds within the family, let alone as leaders within their community. By appealing to the strengthening of the family, the Pope is not only suggesting the new roles we must play in honoring our God given responsibilities as parents and children, he is importantly reminding us that we can only solve our crises TOGETHER as a family unit and in a broader sense in the community as a whole, not by the tired habit of divide and conquer.

It is time for us to open our minds to this broader context. Just as the Enlightenment changed the way Western predominantly Judeo-Christian societies have thought about the world, so too has Islam instructed that “seeking knowledge is mandatory for every believer.” Everything that we have learned over the years is that all men and women are created equal (although women are clearly a more level-headed and moderating force in society), that peace comes about through dialogue and understanding, not war, and that the sustainability of our entire world depends upon a mutual commitment and respect to the environment and resources which we all share on God’s green earth.

Given the efforts to which Pope Francis has encouraged a more forward looking, tolerant and inclusive world view, I firmly believe that this is the wise and joyful approach to honor the legacy of my father.

But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your forefathers served beyond the River, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD.

- Joshua 24:15

 

Happy ペンテコステ

It is a great gift to celebrate our differences of land, language and liturgy while sharing the blessing of a common purpose.

All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in foreign languages as the Spirit gave them that ability. (Acts 2:4)

It is an obligation to raise our voices and speak out against the politics of division. Just as Pope Francis joins in prayer together with Presidents Mahmoud Abbas and Shimon Peres, Pentacost is a calling for us to come together and receive the blessings of unity and peace.

Thou shalt not judge.

Judge Not

Where would we be if the media were not to judge the words and actions of others. I enjoy a healthy public debate, especially when religion is involved. Indeed, the first amendment to the U.S. Constitution puts the freedom of religion and freedom of speech on equal footing. To profess one’s religious beliefs, however, as a right to do harm and injustice to others, is a wrongdoing both to the Bible and the Bill of Rights.

It is human nature to judge and to condemn wrongful actions, which does require a moral compass. I believe that God gave us free will and the intelligence to discern between right and wrong, with religious teachings as a guide. That should not be an excuse to blindly follow those who are too quick to render judgement. The responsibility for interpretation lies with each of us. Inevitably, we will disagree from time to time – but hopefully without being disagreeable.

I stepped into the fray today over a cancelled reality show when – once again - an ill-informed politician raised the evil specter of facist nazism when the “liberal” A&E network cancelled a television show because of the “anti-gay” views of it’s makers. It is an obscene injustice to compare this flap over a home-flipping show to Nazi atrocities. It is all the more onerous when the accusations come from the elected representative, especially one from the Republican Party, which is quick to otherwise defend the rights of “corporate citizens.”

More than the content of this so-called “scandal,” though, I am struck by the lack of reservation and historical perspective that so many politicians seem to have these days. Easter this year has prompted me to revisit the foundations of the New Testament. As I read Mathew, Mark, Luke and John, I am impressed by the humility and sense of justice with which Jesus makes his case to the people. Pope Francis rekindles this authoritative spirit in both word and deed.

We should not fall prey to social injustices even if they are made in the name of religious tolerance. Instead, we should use our God given good judgement to ask ourselves whether scandal mongers are simply after personal or professional gain and reject them as such. In the spirit of Pope Francis we should focus on individual responsibility and the ties that bind us beyond our personal and political differences.

Tweet @pontifex 01. May 2014

Let leaders lead.

Ironically, the day after the Washington Post published an article about President Obama’s  failures as a leader, it praised the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI as a true act of leadership that gave way to Pope Francis. Their conclusion: “sometimes the most meaningful way to lead is to know when it’s time to leave.”

While the newspaper and many other critics of the US President rightly point out that “the poor messaging, the lack of commitment to strong, effective government, and the president’s aversion to treating the problem with an aggressiveness that equaled its magnitude” have undermined the president’s authority, it would hardly be considered an act of leadership if the President of the United States simply walked away from his job. To be clear, the Washington Post did not suggest that the President should resign amidst  doubts about his leadership, but the proximity of the two articles and an ongoing debate about a crisis in Washington does suggest a loss of faith in the president and his ability to govern.

Leadership is not and never should be just about charisma and the bully pulpit. If that were the case, the chances for Chris Christie in 2016 are still pretty good. It should also be about the issues. For those of us who believe that Obama can and should do more to fulfill the spirit of his 2008 election there is still (fading) hope, but only if the nation at large finally gets behind him. Good and effective leaders, after all, need a congregation ready and willing to follow.

As it is written in St. Paul’s letter to the Hebrews 13:17,

Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with groaning, for that would be of no advantage to you.

To the faithful freedom fighters that may sound heretical, but unlike the papacy, governing in a democracy is as much about the system of government as it is about the person who governs. People are elected with an open and well debated agenda and elections are supposed to matter. Unfortunately, gerrymandered congressional districts and a fractious, belligerent political arena too often stands in the way of change as populist forces can just wait out their opponents from their save havens of political combat. It’s as if the preacher had to put up with spitballs from the front pew with willing parishioners idly standing by.

The real virtue of the 86 year-old Pope Benedict - who as reported by the Washington Post admits that he no longer had the “strength of mind and body” for the job – was the courage and humility to let the Church move on when he could no longer keep up with it. President Obama, while no doubt tired and worn down after 5 years of public groaning, still has plenty of vigor left in him. It’s time for the public to stop bellyaching and focus their soul searching instead on what we can do to make things better until the next election. Then we can decide on a new course.

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas

A couple of days ago Pope Francis tweeted…

Christmas celebrations are often full of sound. It would be good for us to make room for silence, to hear the voice of Love.

What a great message for Christmas morning as well – a good day to rise early for quiet and peaceful reflection. Soon enough the world will awake to the  sounds of wrapping paper and ringtones. And for those of us lucky enough to enjoy a holiday feast, the kitchen will then chime in with the clangor of pots and pans.

So before the world wakes up, I am thinking of family and friends and give thanks to all the quiet blessings of life this Christmas day.

Man in the Middle

From a shortlist that included Edward Snowden, Bashar Assad and Ted Cruz, it is a true blessing that Pope Francis was chosen as TIME Magazine’s Person of the Year:

The first non-European pope in 1,200 years is poised to transform a place that measures change by the century.

It is in that spirit of change that the significance of TIME’s choice lies. Regardless of faith and personal circumstance, Pope Francis stirs a real hope that things can and will change for the better. In a year full of disenchantment in political leaders and other agents of change, the Pope holds out the prospect for a renewed optimism.

As “OnFaith” blogger Elizabeth Tenety writes in the Washington Post, progressives in media and politics have embraced with glee the new Pope’s critique on “the “obsessed” narrow-mindedness of those in the church.” The Pope’s message of humility, tolerance and inclusion are indeed a big draw for those of us disillusioned by some conservatives too quick to judge alternative lifestyles and progressive beliefs.

Elizabeth Tenety also points out, however, that Pope Francis is not in fact advocating an overhaul of the core beliefs of the Church. He is no more in favor of gay marriage or abortion than previous popes. The new Pope does, on the other hand, want to change the culture and tone of debate around these (for conservatives) controversial issues in favor of greater reconciliation and understanding. 

In life, as in politics, we may not always agree on what is “right”, but we can usually agree on what is wrong. According to the Proverbs 6:16-19

There are six things that the Lord hates, seven that are an abomination to him: haughty eyes, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, a heart that devises wicked plans, feet that make haste to run to evil, a false witness who breathes out lies, and one who sows discord among brothers.

If sowing the seeds of discord – the greatest of these abominations – has had an impact on our lives this past year, then clearly some of the other candidates on TIME’s shortlist deserve their due recognition. The will to overcome and improve the human condition, however, seems to have a greater appeal to the masses. The quest for peace, a sustainable environment and economy, a just government, respect for privacy and civil liberties, human rights and the freedom from poverty and oppression – these are the things we can and should agree on.

Pope Francis stands center stage in these debates. As a moderator and man in the middle, who seeks to surround himself by a congregation of the faithful committed to achieving a greater good, he deserves our prayers and the acclaim as TIME magazine’s Person of the Year.

One Nation under God

While economists, politicians and “corporate citizens” alike regularly talk about sustainability as an economic and environmental necessity, Pope Francis has now upped the ante. Stepping again out of the comfort zone of the Vatican and into the fray of real world politics, the Pope provides a moral imperative against income inequality, which arguably is itself a threat to sustainability.

Just as the commandment “Thou shalt not kill” sets a clear limit in order to safeguard the value of human life, today we also have to say “thou shalt not” to an economy of exclusion and inequality. Such an economy kills.

The Pope’s message delivered as part of the Evangelii Gaudium is a challenge against the notion of trickle down economics, in which the spoils of the rich are lauded by some as the means to an end of prosperity and justice for all.

In the true spirit of Christianity, the Pope urges that more focus be given to compassion for the poor and disadvantaged. It isn’t charity or socialism he’s lobbying for. His message is against a culture of indifference in which the rich and powerful are expected to win out.  As in Rawl’s “A Theory of Justice”, the Pope makes the case that it is in the greater interest of society as a whole if there if the goals of liberty and equality can be reconciled. Indeed, many economists argue that inequality is a major deterrent to growth.

The Pope’s admonition is in line with his other messages in which he condemns the marginalization of the vulnerable and easily ostracized in society, including those “without work, without possibilities, without any means of escape.” Instead, he argues for more tolerance and inclusion.

In the end, the Pope is not just advocating a utopian world view. His challenge is to achieve a more faithful approach, in which the needs of many are not ignored to the benefit of a privileged few. When he asked for our prayers, Pope Francis is giving us a wake up call. It is not only time for us to pray for him, but for each other. Only then can we be confident of a sustainable and rewarding future.