Monthly Archives: May 2014

Thou shalt not judge.

Judge Not

Where would we be if the media were not to judge the words and actions of others. I enjoy a healthy public debate, especially when religion is involved. Indeed, the first amendment to the U.S. Constitution puts the freedom of religion and freedom of speech on equal footing. To profess one’s religious beliefs, however, as a right to do harm and injustice to others, is a wrongdoing both to the Bible and the Bill of Rights.

It is human nature to judge and to condemn wrongful actions, which does require a moral compass. I believe that God gave us free will and the intelligence to discern between right and wrong, with religious teachings as a guide. That should not be an excuse to blindly follow those who are too quick to render judgement. The responsibility for interpretation lies with each of us. Inevitably, we will disagree from time to time – but hopefully without being disagreeable.

I stepped into the fray today over a cancelled reality show when – once again – an ill-informed politician raised the evil specter of facist nazism when the “liberal” A&E network cancelled a television show because of the “anti-gay” views of it’s makers. It is an obscene injustice to compare this flap over a home-flipping show to Nazi atrocities. It is all the more onerous when the accusations come from the elected representative, especially one from the Republican Party, which is quick to otherwise defend the rights of “corporate citizens.”

More than the content of this so-called “scandal,” though, I am struck by the lack of reservation and historical perspective that so many politicians seem to have these days. Easter this year has prompted me to revisit the foundations of the New Testament. As I read Mathew, Mark, Luke and John, I am impressed by the humility and sense of justice with which Jesus makes his case to the people. Pope Francis rekindles this authoritative spirit in both word and deed.

We should not fall prey to social injustices even if they are made in the name of religious tolerance. Instead, we should use our God given good judgement to ask ourselves whether scandal mongers are simply after personal or professional gain and reject them as such. In the spirit of Pope Francis we should focus on individual responsibility and the ties that bind us beyond our personal and political differences.

Tweet @pontifex 01. May 2014